About Arinda Truter

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So far Arinda Truter has created 29 blog entries.

Electronic signature of sale of immovable property agreements – what’s new?

By |2022-06-14T07:36:09+01:00June 14th, 2022|Commercial Law, Consumer Law, ICT Law|

Of course each case has to be tried on its own facts and merits based on the particular circumstances, but until there is absolute certainty on the matter in the form of an amendment to the relevant legislation to specifically cater for signatures of land sale agreements in this manner, or a Supreme Court of Appeal ruling confirming this stance, we strongly advise against signing any agreement for the alienation of land other than by way of the traditional wet ink on paper.

I bought a vehicle from a dealer and found it is defective – now what?

By |2022-03-09T16:37:27+00:00February 23rd, 2022|Consumer, Litigation, Uncategorised|

We are receiving an increasing number of queries concerning defects in motor vehicles bought from dealers and this article summarises your rights and possible next legal steps in these circumstances. If you approach the dealer and he/she refuses to act in accordance with the CPA by repairing the vehicle or refunding you (depending on what you requested), you will need to submit a complaint against the dealer at the Motor Vehicle Ombudsman (“MIOSA”) in terms of section 82(6) of the CPA.

M Booysen v J Dolley-Major (Case No: 5043/2021) Landmark case – Naming an alleged rapist on social media

By |2021-11-24T14:42:36+00:00November 24th, 2021|Litigation, Social Media law|

It is important that each defamation matter be consider on its own set of facts. A defamation matter is never a clear-cut court case, and you should consider your legal routes carefully before proceeding. The case entitled M Booysen v J Dolley-Major (Case No: 5043/2021) in a landmark defamation case to consider.

The consequences of the Cybercrimes Act on Social Media (ab)use

By |2021-06-14T08:45:05+01:00June 10th, 2021|Cyber Crime and Insurance, ICT Law, Social Media law|

The Cybercrimes Act (the Act) focuses mainly on criminalising the interference with computer systems and data, which is described in more detail in Andrew Marshall’s article on the subject. However, the Act also has bearing on the way we use (and often abuse) social media which will have an impact on the general public. What you share on social media platforms, including WhatsApp and WhatsApp groups, could now land you in jail if we consider the sections relating to “malicious communications” in the Act.

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